Established in 2010, Commoners began with the aim of making design attainable and quality assured. Adopting a minimalist aesthetic and investing in considered fabrications, our pieces match form with function in the pursuit of longevity. Clean lines, pared-back palettes and uncomplicated silhouettes define our classic basics and seasonal pieces for both men and women, distinctly developed with a focus on natural materials and treated to feel like your newest old friend.

PRODUCTION

Our Makers

Commoners garments are the product of the long-established relationships between our design team, based in Auckland, and offshore productions partners, based in Zhong Shan, China.

Working with three specialist factories, we produce our collections in small unit runs, and we visit regularly to ensure our shared standards for quality, craftsmanship and care (for people and planet) are aligned.

PROCESS

Our Process

1. DESIGN | Collections are created by the Commoners design team in Auckland, guided by our pursuit for pared-back pieces that transcend trends to become tomorrow’s classics.

2. Specification | We choose proven, high-quality fabrications, considered details and minimal cut numbers to create long-lasting garments and reduce overproduction.

3. Manufacturing | Designs are delivered to our production partners and created with care by small teams on specialist equipment and in limited quantities to meet our unique requirements.

4. Shipping | Finished garments are sent from our Auckland stockroom to our flagship store in Ponsonby and stockists around NZ, Australia and US. Soon we hope to do this using only biodegradable, compostable, potato-starch packaging.

5. Retail | The Commoners store and online team will help you find the right pieces for your wardrobe and deliver them to you in a recyclable store or courier bag – even happily follow up with care advice to keep them in best condition.

TRANSPARENCY

Our Mission

Existing in an industry widely recognised as a key contributor to environmental degradation, we recognise our role in this system and our duty of care in creating a better one.

Each day we are making smarter decisions in the way we design, manufacture and deliver our product to you, blending modern designs with thoughtful production to meet today’s wardrobe needs and tomorrow’s environmental challenges.

This process is ongoing, and while we have always placed environmentally-preferred, natural materials at the forefront of our range, we are purposefully exploring new technologies in fabrication, packaging and recycling processes so we can keep doing better.

Care instructions

How to care for your Clothing

The care instructions on our garments’ labels will give you advice on how to best care for your garment, making sure that they remain long-loved favourites for years to come.

Cotton Jersey

Caring for 100% cotton clothes is easier than what most people think of. When hand washing is not an option, the delicate cycle on your machine is preferred. The use of cold water is recommended. If you feel you must, then warm water but never hot water unless you intend to have the cotton item to shrink. Also, always turn the item inside out to protect the outer side when washing. When drying on a clothes line outside, keep the cloths turned inside out, this will prevent the sun from fading the fabric.

Our cotton jersey is overdyed in the production process, so it’s only natural for the richness of colour to fade ever so slightly with the first wash. To maintain light colours and keep them bright, it’s a good idea to pre-treat stains in areas such as underarms, necklines, and cuffs.

  • Wash inside-out
  • Cold, gentle machine wash
  • Hang inside out to dry

Fleece

Caring for 100% cotton clothes is easier than what most people think of. When hand washing is not an option, the delicate cycle on your machine is preferred. The use of cold water is recommended. If you feel you must, then warm water but never hot water unless you intend to have the cotton item to shrink. Also always turn the cloths inside out to protect the outer side when washing. When drying on a clothes line outside keep the cloths turned inside out. This will prevent the sun from fading the fabric.

Our cotton jersey is overdyed in the production process, so it’s only natural for the richness of colour to fade ever so slightly with the first wash. To maintain light colours and keep them bright, it’s a good idea to pre-treat stains in areas such as underarms, necklines, and cuffs.

  • Wash inside-out
  • Cold, gentle machine wash
  • Hang inside out to dry

Linen

It is a common misconception that linen needs specialist care. This couldn’t be further from the truth, and we want to help you see just how easy it is to care for linen and to keep it looking beautiful for years to come. Made from the fibres of the flax plant, linen has been cultivated and used as a textile for thousands of years, long before the existence of dry cleaners or fancy detergents. In fact, it is such a natural, simple fabric that caring for it is simple too.

How do I wash linen?
Linen becomes softer and more absorbent after each wash, which is great! Wash linen on a cold water cycle. Use the gentle machine cycle and a mild detergent to protect the fibres.

  • Wash inside-out
  • Cold, gentle machine wash
  • Hang inside out to dry

Tip: Don’t overcrowd the washing machine with too many items at once. This can cause twisting or pulling the linen out of shape.

Knitwear

Wools don’t need washing as often as other fibres might, in fact, they will last a lot longer between washes if you don’t. Here are a few things you can do instead:

Air it out - simply hang out your garment, many types of wool have anti-bacterial properties already in the fibre and will self-clean.

Brush it - brushing wools will not only prevent pilling (give it a little extra brush where the garment is most subjected to friction, under arms and the side where you hang your bag) but also releases its natural oils, which rejuvenates the material.

Spot clean – why clean the whole garment if only a small area needs it? And when doing this, be careful not to use too much concentrated detergent as this can damage the material.

Fine Knitwear: You must dryclean our fine knitwear. Otherwise follow the above alternative steps.

Blended Knitwear: If you do want to machine wash the garment and it is not considered fine knitwear, make sure that it’s done so on a gentle, cold cycle.

DO NOT TUMBLE DRY KNITWEAR. No knitted things will enjoy a trip round the tumble dryer. Instead, when drying, lay your woollens flat on a towel to absorb any extra moisture, whilst gently reshaping them (knits can be heavy when wet and that extra weight will pull them out of shape if you dry them over a rail or hanging up).

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